Avi Muchnick

"My name in large, bold font."

1,135 notes &

fiftythreenyc:

Stories reveal character.
There’s a simple fix here. We think Facebook can apply the same degree of thought they put into the app into building a brand name of their own. An app about stories shouldn’t start with someone else’s story. Facebook should stop using our brand name.

fiftythreenyc:

Stories reveal character.

There’s a simple fix here. We think Facebook can apply the same degree of thought they put into the app into building a brand name of their own. An app about stories shouldn’t start with someone else’s story. Facebook should stop using our brand name.

4 notes &

The Resurrection of Worth1000!

I’m excited to announce that Emerge Media has agreed to buy Worth1000, restore it to its former glory and take it to the next level. A huge part of my life’s work will continue on, inspiring other people to creativity. AWESOME.

Emerge own and operate a network of great sites, including Bands.com, Translate.com, Podcasts.com and more…

Contests resuming tonight! :-D

Full details here:

http://comm.worth1000.com/discussions/70783/worth1000-is-back-baby

Filed under worth1000 avi muchnick

325 notes &

naveen:

a personal API
i’ve long been a follower of the quantified self – even back before we started calling it that and started building all this software behind it. when i was in graduate school, i remember thinking i wasn’t reading enough. so i made an effort to cut through many must-read books (75). in two years of school, i tracked (microsoft excel, as you do) each page read (21,278) and the number of days (622) and kept a running log of pages-per-day (34.21). i got my goal of 10,000 pages a year and, bonus!, i got through a few classics that still continue to be my favorite stories.
…
as a part of all these experiences, i’ve always been curious about the idea of a personal API – a ‘quantified naveen’ – that would expose all of the information i knew about myself in a clean, open document.
…
as a way to start this off, i’ve put up an API of such personal data. i’m calling it api.naveen. 

A personal API is an idea I’ve thought many times about. So glad to see this being tackled by a great entrepreneur.

naveen:

a personal API

i’ve long been a follower of the quantified self – even back before we started calling it that and started building all this software behind it. when i was in graduate school, i remember thinking i wasn’t reading enough. so i made an effort to cut through many must-read books (75). in two years of school, i tracked (microsoft excel, as you do) each page read (21,278) and the number of days (622) and kept a running log of pages-per-day (34.21). i got my goal of 10,000 pages a year and, bonus!, i got through a few classics that still continue to be my favorite stories.

as a part of all these experiences, i’ve always been curious about the idea of a personal API – a ‘quantified naveen’ – that would expose all of the information i knew about myself in a clean, open document.

as a way to start this off, i’ve put up an API of such personal data. i’m calling it api.naveen

A personal API is an idea I’ve thought many times about. So glad to see this being tackled by a great entrepreneur.

9 notes &

Google Glass & Photography

Photographers sacrifice the present to remember the past in the future.

This weekend I attended a wedding where smartphones being used as cameras were everywhere. It really highlighted for me how people don’t live in the moment anymore. The idea of removing the barrier between you and the moment you are enjoying has always been a dream of mine. I resent spending time at my kids’ birthday parties watching the candles be blown out on a 4-inch screen instead of being fully immersed in my children’s happiness. 

Until now there hasn’t been a potentially legit way to live in the moment AND preserve the memory. Enter Google Glass.

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In my day job, I oversee the future of the product direction at Aviary. Our company mission is to democratize creativity. We provide a powerful photo editor that is relied on by thousands of companies and millions of people each day. So I’m not going to miss an opportunity to immerse myself in new photographic mediums we might need to develop for. We were one of the first in line to buy Glass at Google IO last year.

To be candid, my first hour with Glass wasn’t great. I won’t go into all the problems it has here. There are other more technical reviews for that. And to be fair, my disappointment is probably my own fault for buying into the hype. Despite the marketing, this is not a super-jet. It’s the Wright brother’s first plane. If I had looked forward to Glass as just a taste of things to come, I wouldn’t have been let down.

The experiment

I decided to ignore my first impressions and forced myself to wear Glass for an entire weekend, focusing exclusively on the photography aspect of it. That’s all I really cared about after all: Could I use Glass as the solution to my inability to both live in the moment and preserve my memories? That’s what I wanted to find out.

I would set to doing all the suburban weekend father things I normally do, and see how using Glass as my exclusive camera changed my everyday life: I alternate between lugging around a DSLR and using my iPhone 5 camera to capture the recordable parts of my family life: My son’s Little League and hockey games. Playing stickball with my kids in the park. Family biking and rollerblading. My daughter’s piano practice. Eating in restaurants, with 4 kids in tow.

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One of the biggest challenges with Glass is not feeling like a douchebag / nerd / show-off when you wear them in public. What was clear to me was that strangers do notice them and they do not judge you negatively at all (yet). Quite the opposite actually. Google Glass acted like a welcoming beacon for strangers to come over and make small talk (always resulting in a request to try them on). I’m a bit shy and my interests don’t often dovetail with the doctors and lawyers of suburbia, so it was pleasant to find myself talking technology with strangers. Some people may find this attention uncomfortable though. I expect it will diminish as Glass becomes more common.

Actually interacting with my children became a pleasure. I will often come back from vacations with thousands of photos (no hyperbole) in my struggle to get the “perfect shot.” And while I love taking the photos, the minimalist in me always thinks about how clean and enjoyable my life would be without the added distraction of a camera. Having an uninterrupted, undistracted catch with my son simply couldn’t happen before with a phone or camera in my hand. Watching him make a great play and not having to view it through a viewfinder means I actually get to enjoy the moment in real-life with all of my senses intact.

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To be sure, there are still distractions (i.e. the voice controls in a noisy Little League game don’t work very well) and there is a learning curve to not missing key moments by spending 5 seconds navigating the voice menu to take a photo or record a video (Google smartly provides a shortcut snapshot button on the frame). You are aware it’s on your face and you can’t move it completely out of your field of view, which can be headache inducing. But as you learn to use it, these first-world problems become less relevant. You can focus on being in the moment.

Glass photography can help society too. I think about the concerts and children’s plays I go to where rude people (read: everyone) hold their phones and sometimes tablets in the air to record what’s in front of them, disrupting the experience for everyone behind them. Glass also has the potential to fix that problem.

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Photo by Martin Fish

What will the impact on photography be?

It wasn’t until I got home and downloaded all of my photos and videos that the importance of Glass really struck me. I could easily tell which photos and video were taken by me and which were taken by my children. The impact of point of view photography is not something I had ever really thought about, though Google had hammered that point home in their original trailers.

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Is that really how gigantic I look to my children? I remember adults being huge when I was a child, but I’d forgotten just how big until now. Seeing mundane photographs from the natural height and angle of their eyes gives them life and makes the photographer relatable. These photos are not artistic, but they have a human soul.

POV photography is such a natural way to return to a moment in time or momentarily slip on someone else’s body and see the world through their eyes. While pro and creative photographers will not give up their hand-held equipment in this lifetime, I am certain that this will become the standard mode of photography for the common masses sometime in the very near future.

Google Glass is an amazing idea whose time has come. Future iterations and competition will make devices like this even better for photography. I can’t wait for Aviary to be a part of this developing medium.

Filed under photography pov aviary google glass glass

83 notes &

New design pattern: Livatars

"Livatars," a Portmanteau for “live avatars,” is a pretty simple concept: Take a traditional headshot and make it subtly animated so the person in it appears alive. It’s an homage to the living newspapers in Harry Potter and player popup profiles that appear on tv during sportscasts. We tried this on Aviary’s company page and have gotten great feedback on it from people who stumbled across it by accident. 

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I wouldn’t even call it a pattern yet, except I just noticed it has also popped up on wefollow’s company page as well. They did a more technically elegant implementation than us (if you don’t care about IE7-8 support): We used animated gifs and they used HTML5 background video with a CSS vector mask on top of it.

Benefits over a traditional headshot:

  • Not boring, without being too over the top or trying too hard. It will probably make the viewer smile when they notice what’s going on.
  • Makes the people in the photo that much more relatable.
  • Seeing one makes you want to see a photo yourself alive on that page as well. What better way to unconsciously recruit?
  • Simpler to implement than other about page easter eggs: Just record a few seconds of video of someone standing still and loop it back and forth.

The trick is to shoot for subtlety and have everyone try to stand completely still when you record them. You want the viewer to do a double take when they think a static snapshot blinks at them out of the corner of their eye as they quickly scan a page.

2 notes &

[We] calibrated details ranging from color shifts, saturation, and contrast, to the shape and blend of the vignettes before handing the specifications over to Aviary, a company specializing in photo editing. They applied their expertise to build the algorithms that matched our filter specs.

Twitter Engineering: How our photo filters came into focus

Read about how @twitter worked with @aviary to build out their new photo filters. Mad props to both teams!

(via afuchs)

(via afuchs)

2 notes &

Birds of a feather flock together

I’m excited to announce that Tobias Peggs has joined the Aviary flock as our new CEO!

Aviary is taking off in ways I never dreamed possible when we adjusted our strategy and launched our photo-editing SDK 15 months ago. We now have more than 25 million monthly active users of Aviary’s products, making their photos look amazing across our distribution network of 2,500 partners. We have an incredible portfolio of partners including large corporations like Yahoo!WalgreensBox and Twitter and many successful indie companies like imgurPicStitch and Juicy Bits. One year after launching, in September 2012, we celebrated editing our 1 billionth photo. Just a few months later, we’re now celebrating passing 2 billion edits. It’s been a great year. But we’re just getting started…

As we move forward, it has become clear to me that the company’s accelerating growth is now bringing us into territory that is best handled by someone with a very specific set of skills and experiences tailored to match our B2B strategy. Tobias has deep experience managing accelerated growth in B2B startups, which makes him the perfect leader for Aviary as it really takes off.

Most recently, Tobias was CEO at OneRiot, managing that company’s transition from consumer to B2B, overseeing its growth and subsequent acquisition by Walmart. There are many specific elements in his background that are highly relevant to Aviary’s business:

  • At OneRiot, he drove fast growth in the business through the distribution of SDKs and business models to a large community of developers.
  •  At Walmart, he was responsible for mobile products in international markets, growing the UK market from zero to 50% of typical weekly global mobile revenue inside 12 months.
  •  He has built and managed large teams across the globe, having previously worked in the US, Europe and Asia.

But beyond his understanding of our developer-focused business, also importantly, he understands what we are doing emotionally. As a former Managing Editor of i-D Magazine, he has a deep appreciation for photography and creativity, which is critical to our culture and mindset at Aviary.

Tobias has been a mentor of mine for almost a year now. Shortly after Aviary changed its business strategy to focus on powering third party apps, one of our investors, Mo Koyfman from Spark Capital, introduced me to Tobias. He had a wealth of leadership knowledge that really impressed me and helped me think through our approach to the business as we grew our partnership base. I am certain that those conversations helped steer Aviary towards its current level of success.

Going forward, I will be Aviary’s Chief Product Officer, focusing on continuing to make Aviary’s product offering the most innovative and pure solution on the market. And in my continued role as Chairman, I’ll make sure the company course stays true on the path towards democratizing creativity.

I’m excited to get the opportunity to work even more closely with a mentor. It represents the opportunity to turn Aviary from a startup with incredible potential into a significant, growing business under Tobias’ leadership.

So I’d like to officially welcome Tobias to the flock. We’ll fly to great places together, as birds of a feather tend to do.

More on the announcement (including a note from Tobias, here)…

38 notes &

jimmydaly:


As the veteran venture capitalist Bill Gurley said recently, it’s important to be an optimist in the startup business, as most great tech companies “will sail close to death and then rise up again.” Just a year and a half ago, Aviary, a New York startup focused on creative tools for photo editing, was certainly lost at sea, its original vision floundering. But by drastically shifting its focus from the web to mobile, and from a consumer facing startup to one that powers other businesses, Aviary has become a juggernaut, the closest thing to a modern day Adobe for the mobile era.

A great business story and just the kind of innovation the photo industry needs. It’s also interesting that Instagram is going the opposite direction - moving mobile to the web - and is still extremely successful.

jimmydaly:

As the veteran venture capitalist Bill Gurley said recently, it’s important to be an optimist in the startup business, as most great tech companies “will sail close to death and then rise up again.” Just a year and a half ago, Aviary, a New York startup focused on creative tools for photo editing, was certainly lost at sea, its original vision floundering. But by drastically shifting its focus from the web to mobile, and from a consumer facing startup to one that powers other businesses, Aviary has become a juggernaut, the closest thing to a modern day Adobe for the mobile era.

A great business story and just the kind of innovation the photo industry needs. It’s also interesting that Instagram is going the opposite direction - moving mobile to the web - and is still extremely successful.

(via peterspear)

1 note &

The answers you didn’t want to hear

Chanukah fell out in late December 2008. My parents took my children to a Chanukah party that was open to the community in a local storefront. It was a community festival and there were inflatable rides and food and games for the little ones. Everyone was having a great time. It was a party put on by a charitable organization called the Chabad, that hosts Jewish themed events around the globe.

This was just a few short weeks after the tragic massacre in Mumbai, where terrorists deliberately attacked a Chabad house, among other targets. Although we were out in Long Island, NY, anyone attending a Chabad event anywhere in the world was on high alert.

But still, nothing could happen to us right? 

Aviary’s office at the time wasn’t too far from where the event was happening, when I heard ridiculous amounts of sirens in the distance coming from the vicinity of where the party was and my cell phone started getting flooded with texts asking if my children were OK? and Did I hear about the terrorist attack at the Chabad event? A car had driven through a storefront and run over dozens of people.

I thought, no way. Impossible.

I thought… nothing.

I just ran.

There were crowds of people and ambulances and police cars and helicopters circling overhead. booming above all of them was utter confusion and panic.

People were crying. Parents were searching for their children. Police were trying to separate nosy neighbors from those who were locating relatives.

My cell phone rang – it was my parents. My heart skipped a beat.

I learned we were fortunate. My children were on the other side of the room and were not in specific danger, though they had watched the scene unfold. My parents didn’t know much except that a car had accelerated through the storefront window at full speed and plowed through the crowd of adults and children, running over several.

My parents said my kids had been playing in that spot 30 seconds earlier. 

My father helped other people lift the car off of someone trapped underneath – someone I learned later was a close friend who suffered permanent damage and was taken by helicopter for emergency surgery. 

14 people were injured. Fortunately, everyone survived.

We learned later that it was an accident, not a terrorist attack. Somehow an elderly man hit the accelerator instead of the brake at a red light and couldn’t get his car to stop, so he coincidentally turned it into the one temporary storefront that was jam packed with children one day of the year. Crazy.

My heart goes out to the parents and community in Connecticut who lost their children and loved ones. Their tragedy is so difficult to comprehend, even with this relatively small reference point of my own. 

I’ll never forget the panic and dread and numbness I experienced that one afternoon when I didn’t have answers.

I can’t even imagine what it feels like as a parent to get the answers you didn’t want to hear.

3 notes &

Incredibly, Aviary pulled ahead of Facebook and Twitter in iPhone’s Top Free rankings.
Currently at #26 overall and #4 in Photos in the USA.
Edit: Currently at #20 overall and #3 in Photos in the USA.

Incredibly, Aviary pulled ahead of Facebook and Twitter in iPhone’s Top Free rankings.

Currently at #26 overall and #4 in Photos in the USA.

Edit: Currently at #20 overall and #3 in Photos in the USA.

59 notes &

53's Paper

parislemon:

My god is this app gorgeous. One of the best-looking iPad apps ever created, and a perfect example of creativity/creation on the device. 

This is the first pure creativity app that has ever made it onto my dock. I use it EVERY. SPARE. SECOND. I find that it’s a form of creative meditation for me. This is the drawing app I have been waiting 15 years for, ever since I first discovered the clunky Wacom tablet experienced.

I haven’t even really tried it with a stylus yet. I almost don’t even want to.

I’ve had the app for 48 hours and it’s woken something hungry inside of me. 

Best money I’ve spent on a mobile app to date.

52 notes &

On painting lessons

She paused.

"Um, what are you doing?"

My wife stepped carefully over a paint can and one of my legs. She peered quizzically at my lower half, sticking out from under my 8-year-old’s newly painted desk as if I was tuning up a car.

"I’m teaching Kayla a lesson."

"By painting under her desk?”

"Exactly."

"Wait, what? That’s a lesson?"

"It’s one of the most important ones I know. I’m also inscribing a note."

She waited.

I finished up, snapped a photo of the inscription and popped out from below. I showed her the photo on my phone.

She understood.

_____________________

The desk was a present. My daughter turns 8 today and more than ever I feel like a father. It’s not just her age that makes me feel this way, but her growing talents and my responsibilities in nurturing them. She, like me, is a Builder of Things. 

She draws. She paints. She makes books (as in literally, *makes* them, from the bindings to the illustrations to the stories within). She makes puppets. She takes photos. She. Makes. Things.

And she is very, very good at what she does. 

I want to help her channel her creative energy in a way that will let her inspire others as she grows. She is a next generation maker and the creative tools already at her disposal make my childhood tools look like Play-Doh in comparison (because, actually that’s what it was). She will be leaps and bounds ahead of me. I want to pass on some of the lessons that I only learned in my twenties and thirties, now, while she is still moldable.

_____________________

This particular lesson is simple: 

I’m not going to tell her there is an inscription under her desk or even that I painted all the areas normally hidden from view. But one day - probably at some point over this year or the next - she will be playing hide and seek and find shelter under the desk. Maybe she’ll be recovering a lost toy and happen to look up. She might notice that I have taken time to painstakingly paint an area of her desk that is normally never seen.

She might not. 

But at some point in the near future, she will notice the inscription:

"Kayla, Real accomplishment is in the details - even the hidden ones. Always take the time to do a job right... Love Forever, Daddy"

And then, I hope, the lesson will be learned.

More to come on Twitter @avimuchnick.

Filed under startup lessons paint details desk parenting